Linux on Chromebooks and Light Emitting Diodes, Hak5 1721

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Can a $200 Chromebook run linux? Darren finds out with a Crouton! Plus – The ins and outs on LED – Shannon explains. All that and more, this time on Hak5!

Linux Your Chromebook

All this talk about KVM and OpenVZ had me looking into a project I had previously shelved – and that’s running a Ubuntu Linux in a Chrooted environment on a Chromebook.

Chromebooks are awesome because they’re light and cheap and run Chrome and SSH – but that’s where it ends.

It’s nice being able to hit CTRL+ALT+T…


30 thoughts on “Linux on Chromebooks and Light Emitting Diodes, Hak5 1721”

  • Robin Hoodly

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    will this method work on a samsung 303c

    Reply
  • David Sassoon

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    How can you bring the chromebook back to factory settings ?

    Reply
  • 0MN1 Revis

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    I can't find the crouton integration extension in the web store and yes I did everything you did exactly. Pls help

    Reply
  • KING CUSTOMZZ

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    Im really into hacking i want to wok with your guys

    Reply
  • Gaurav Desale

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    Is it possible to install Kali 2.0 on chrome book? Just like the way he used to install Ubuntu but with the Kali ISO

    Reply
  • Irfan T

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    does Linux work on HP Chromebook 11?

    Reply
  • lorenzo501

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    Could I also use BackTrack on a chromebook? And do things like aircrack and such even work on a chromebook? Or should I just put xubuntu on it <.<

    Reply
  • Nom Nom

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    lol a Chromebook already run Linux when you buy it 😀

    Reply
  • blottao

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    great, I'll use firefox on it!

    Reply
  • Scott Schultz

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    @Shannon Morse – LEDs are pretty fun little things. One point that you might want to check out is that when an LED is in reverse bias (hooked up 'backwards') the internal capacitance can actually be used to sense light. So while a forward biased LED emits light, the reverse biased one can be used to detect it. Reverse biased LED's will leak current in a manner proportional to the intensity of the ambient light. Pretty cool stuff, IMO. Why would you ever want to do this? Well, one use case would be that an LED that is used as some sort of status indicator needs to be very bright in daylight conditions, but could be much dimmer and still be useful in the dark. With a microcontroller and some code, you could use that single LED to display the status AND to monitor the ambient light conditions, and then PWM the LED to an appropriate brightness level. In a battery operated device, this could add up to substantial power savings over time. Have fun! Oh, and I really enjoy the show — you and DK do a great job!

    Reply
  • Daviljoe193

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    Personally, I prefer using ACTUAL Linux, and I like my computers to have a BIOS that isn't… Google's. I just flashed a real BIOS on my C720p, and it's currently running Arch Linux (Yes, with a real BIOS, I got 64-bit Arch to get past Grub, which has been an issue with the C720 Chromebook in particular.), and I have the things that Croutoners don't have, like Virtualbox (The Chrome OS kernel is missing the necessities to run Virtualbox.), and anything very kernel specific. Currently, I've been using it like this for about two days, and it has definitely made me stop reaching for my tablet, and even for my stack of laptops (All of which weight way more than 2 pounds.), along with my server desktop (Which is Vista era, and runs Debian Wheezy, with some non Wheezy stuff added in.). It still has some GPU related hangs, but when kernel 3.19 hits Arch Linux, that should be fixed.

    Reply
  • Garner Marshall

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    Crouton Explained on an HP Chromebook 11

    Reply
  • Steinar A

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    Awesome "feature" on the Chromebox!

    Reply
  • Aaron Steger

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    Did Darren just burn Revision3 at 27:22?  I've stayed away from Rev3 since Tekzilla got dropped.

    Reply
  • Jim Goltz

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    I got excited because I thought they were going to tell us about LEDs that can run Linux.

    Reply
  • HiMike12

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    More server projects pls

    Reply
  • Dtr146

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    yall be late as hell with this

    Reply
  • Samar Sunkaria

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    Debian would be running on the same kernel as the Chrome OS…. right?
    So, what would uname -a return?
    +Darren Kitchen 

    Reply
  • 007order007

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    How about kali

    Reply
  • SpeedoJoe

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    The current user is right there in the shell.

    Reply
  • tehtron

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    "There revision 3 slash hak5… Sometimes they post episodes of hak5… Sometimes they don't" LOL

    Reply
  • superspeeed

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    10:55 "well I had it working" story of my relationship with linux

    Reply
  • tehtron

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    I don't like chrooting a chromebook because feeling of being less secure

    Reply
  • Zato Tech

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    Out of personal experience I found that the math is always correct for calculating Ohms, but the resistors are not correct. The reason for this is that there are some errors within resistors, so if the resistor is a lower Ohm than it is suppose to be (or very bad quality), the LED or resistor might start heating up(and even fail after long use). As a tip for beginners, if you calculate an Ohm value for a resistor to limit the current, always go one value higher. If you calculated 277ohms, don't go for 280. Go to 290, 300 or 330 (which ever is available to you). Yes, prototypes might work well with the 280ohm (if that is what you calculated), but building something that lasts will require some changes. The LED will be a little bit dimmer (if you can even notice it) but it will not fail due if you design it as a fixed installment. Thanks for the great episode and keep up the great work Hak5. Happy 2015.

    Reply
  • Brandyn Kelly

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    +Daniel Herd 

    Reply
  • S.C.D.

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    May be obvoius, better and cheaper to desolder eletronic components. People give away cheap and cheesy clocks, calculators and LED light flashlights all the time as well.

    Reply
  • Waifu Trump

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    All chromebooks run linux… they have linux firmware, "coreboot" – which is faster than booting with proprietary bios.

    Reply
  • flip

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    well unless you buy LED`s with the resister built in

    Reply
  • Eden Maynard

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    I've got the Acer C720 and I find Ubuntu runs faster than Chrome OS. 

    Reply
  • Ana Johnsten

    February 12, 2019 at 7:42 am

    great episode guys!

    Reply

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